Get a grip

Get a Grip

Get a Grip

Once more I have returned to using hands as a metaphor for mental & existential conditions.

This time the work deals with the idea that we should all just get a grip on ourselves when feeling out of sorts and what goes on beneath the surface when that is not possible.

The hands are gripping the railings, falling down the stairs and into a tiny pool. They themselves are golden and shiny.The materials, colours and the surfaces in the space which is portrayed don't seem to bare any logical connection to the scene. The distressing impact the balls have on the hands, which all though they are in a pose that signals alertness but also solidity, seem out of proportion.

The idea behind it is that all though things seem somewhat organised on the outside, everything becomes a precarious balancing act when we loose our grip on reality.

Once more I have returned to using hands as a metaphor for mental & existential conditions.

This time the work deals with the idea that we should all just get a grip on ourselves when feeling out of sorts and what goes on beneath the surface when that is not possible.

The hands are gripping the railings, falling down the stairs and into a tiny pool. They themselves are golden and shiny.The materials, colours and the surfaces in the space which is portrayed don't seem to bare any logical connection to the scene. The distressing impact the balls have on the hands, which all though they are in a pose that signals alertness but also solidity, seem out of proportion.

The idea behind it is that all though things seem somewhat organised on the outside, everything becomes a precarious balancing act when we loose our grip on reality.

Once more I have returned to using hands as a metaphor for mental & existential conditions.

This time the work deals with the idea that we should all just get a grip on ourselves when feeling out of sorts and what goes on beneath the surface when that is not possible.

The hands are gripping the railings, falling down the stairs and into a tiny pool. They themselves are golden and shiny.The materials, colours and the surfaces in the space which is portrayed don't seem to bare any logical connection to the scene. The distressing impact the balls have on the hands, which all though they are in a pose that signals alertness but also solidity, seem out of proportion.

The idea behind it is that all though things seem somewhat organised on the outside, everything becomes a precarious balancing act when we loose our grip on reality.

 

songs of a canary in a coal mine




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